While reading Zacharias Ursinus’ commentary on the Heidelberg Catechism the other night, I came across a quote that I had once heard, but had since misquoted and, honestly, never knew where it was from. I was happy to finally come across the quote in print.

Our safety does not lie in our own hands, or strength; for if it did, we should lose it a thousand times every moment.

Zacharias Ursinus and G. W. Williard, The Commentary of Dr. Zacharias Ursinus on the Heidelberg Catechism (Cincinnati, OH: Elm Street Printing Company, 1888), 19.

The quote comes from Ursinus’ commentary on the first question of the catechism:

Question 1. What is thy only comfort in life and death?

Answer: That I with body and soul, both in life and death, am not my own, but belong unto my faithful Saviour Jesus Christ; who, with his precious blood, has fully satisfied for all my sins, and delivered me from all the power of the devil; and so preserves me that without the will of my heavenly Father, not a hair can fall from my head; yea, that all things must be subservient to my salvation, and therefore, by his Holy Spirit, He also assures me of eternal life, and makes me sincerely willing and ready, henceforth, to live unto him.

In the his commentary on this question, Ursinus helps the Christian remember that the comfort we receive through Christ is held in the powerful hand of the God. I find this…well… comforting.I leave you with this final thought:

This, therefore, is that christian comfort, spoken of in this question of the catechism, which is an only and solid comfort, both in life and death—a comfort consisting in the assurance of the free remission of sin, and of reconciliation with God, by and on account of Christ, and a certain expectation of eternal life, impressed upon the heart by the holy Spirit through the gospel, so that we have no doubt but that we are the property of Christ, and are beloved of God for his sake, and saved forever, according to the declaration of the Apostle Paul: “Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress,” &c. (Rom. 8:35.)

Zacharias Ursinus and G. W. Williard, The Commentary of Dr. Zacharias Ursinus on the Heidelberg Catechism (Cincinnati, OH: Elm Street Printing Company, 1888), 18.

photo credit: dhwright